East London

If you are looking to buy in London then you will find our London Area Guides very useful. Each area guide gives you a quick overview of the neighbourhood from its history to its local amenities.

E6

Location

East Ham is located to the north east of London City Centre. It is demarcated to the north by the railway line upon which Plaistow, Upton Park and East Ham tube stations are located. To the east it is demarcated by the North Circular Road. The southern boundary is the Royal Albert Way, and the western boundary is the A112 (which goes by the names of Prince Regent Lane, Greengate Street, and Plaistow Road). It includes the areas of Plaistow, Newham and Beckton.

The E6 postcode district lies within or includes part of the following towns, counties, localities, electoral wards and stations: Beckton, Beckton Park Station, Beckton Station, Boleyn, Custom House, Cyprus Station, East Ham, East Ham Central, East Ham North, East Ham South, East Ham Station, Gallions Reach Station, Green Street East, London, Newham, Wall End.

History

As with many of the outlying London suburbs, until the mid-nineteenth century the area that now falls into E6 comprised a number of isolated villages, where the main industry was agriculture. In earlier periods, a large area of woodland extended throughout E6, however, this land had disappeared by the late 13th century.

In 1859, East Ham experienced the arrival of the railway, and although urbanisation was initially slow, by the end of the nineteenth century the urbanisation process had picked up pace and the area was developing quickly. This urbanisation was partially a result of the Beckton Gasworks Gas Light and Coke Company, which opened in 1870. As the largest gasworks in Europe, it developed into one of the largest employers in south-west Essex. This, coupled with the docks, attracted an influx of workers from surrounding areas. East Ham became part of Greater London in 1965.

Present Day

Because the area of East Ham experienced the majority of its urbanisation and growth, and demand for housing in the Victorian period, the majority of the property existing today is of that period. Although traditionally the area housed those who worked on the docks, this has changed over recent years with the closure of the docks and the influx of different nationalities, particularly Asian, African and Eastern European.

The area flourished around the turn of the nineteenth century and as a result much of the housing stock comprises of grids of terraced properties. Two popular estates include the Burges Estate and Central Park Estate. The Burgess Estate is made up of the streets in between Southend Road, Burges Road, Barking Road and High Street North. The Central Park Estate is made up of the streets between Barking Road, High Street South, Rancliffe Road and Central Park Road. Many of the terraces in this area have views over Central Park.

Much of the land around Beckton consists of brownfield sites, with the closure of the docks and general decentralisation of industry. Some of this is being regenerated and transformed into out of town shopping centres (in the same way that the areas surrounding Canary Wharf). However, regeneration is always a long process. The former site of the Gas Light and Coke Company is now a shopping centre. The property around this area includes prefabs built after the Second World War to cope with the housing shortage (around the area of Eisenhower Drive). Also around this area are a number of new builds, such as those on Juniper Lane.

Amenities

Because the area of East Ham experienced the majority of its urbanisation and growth, and demand for housing in the Victorian period, the majority of the property existing today is of that period. Although traditionally the area housed those who worked on the docks, this has changed over recent years with the closure of the docks and the influx of different nationalities, particularly Asian, African and Eastern European.

The area flourished around the turn of the nineteenth century and as a result much of the housing stock comprises of grids of terraced properties. Two popular estates include the Burges Estate and Central Park Estate. The Burgess Estate is made up of the streets in between Southend Road, Burges Road, Barking Road and High Street North. The Central Park Estate is made up of the streets between Barking Road, High Street South, Rancliffe Road and Central Park Road. Many of the terraces in this area have views over Central Park.

Much of the land around Beckton consists of brownfield sites, with the closure of the docks and general decentralisation of industry. Some of this is being regenerated and transformed into out of town shopping centres (in the same way that the areas surrounding Canary Wharf). However, regeneration is always a long process. The former site of the Gas Light and Coke Company is now a shopping centre. The property around this area includes prefabs built after the Second World War to cope with the housing shortage (around the area of Eisenhower Drive). Also around this area are a number of new builds, such as those on Juniper Lane.


E15

Location

The E15 postcode district lies within or includes part of the following towns, counties, localities, electoral wards and stations: Bow East, Cann Hall, Canning Town North, Cathall, Forest Gate North, Forest Gate South, London, Maryland Station, Newham, Plaistow North, Pudding Mill Lane Station, Stratford, Stratford and New Town, Stratford Station, Waltham Forest, West Ham, West Ham Station, Wick.

History

Stratford, like so many of London’s suburbs, remained rural until the arrival of the railway. It came to Stratford, instantly transforming it into a potentially residential area, in 1839. This could be considered Stratford’s first phase of development, and it could be said that it is currently undergoing its second phase of development, due to the London 2012 Olympics.

One of the most significant changes being made is that the 180 acre brownfield railway site, north of Stratford town centre, is being redeveloped to form Stratford City. Stratford City will then essentially be a purpose built town, with 5,000 homes and accompanying offices and retail spaces, public spaces and facilities such as schools. Private businesses are also investing in the area, with John Lewis and Waitrose developments already underway. The area will also include the Olympic Village.

Present Day

In 2006 and 2007, Stratford was named as one of the UK’s property hotspots by market commentators, due to the amount of money being spent on the area in regeneration schemes prior to the Olympics. However, it is still relatively affordable in terms of London property prices.

High Road Leyton and Carnarvon Road have some Victorian terraces with five bedrooms that can reach asking prices of around half a million pounds. For a similar price you could secure a two bed flat in the self-proclaimed landmark development of ‘One, Stratford’, which is due to be completed in 2009. For a slightly less expensive home in a modern block, 160-188 High Street, Stratford, also has a flats due for completion in 2009 for just over £400,000. However, for those with smaller budgets, Albert Square has some apartments for sale on a shared ownership basis, with one bed flats being available for less than £60,000, whilst a two bed flat in Chopwell Close will cost more, with an asking price of around £110,000. Burford Wharf also has some reasonably priced two room apartments designed as live-work units, whilst for £190,000, in the same period, it is possible to secure a period conversion on Keogh Road.

For those in search of three bedrooms, the area around E15 has a number of options. At the more affordable end of the scale Marcus Court has three bedroom split level maisonettes with asking prices of around £230,000, whilst Germander Way and Thorogood Gardens also have three bed flats with asking prices of around £235,000. Alternatively, East Road, Westdown Road and Hamfrith Road have conversion flats in varying styles for around £265,000. Corporation Street and Geer Street have some of the most affordable three bed houses in the postcode district, with asking prices of less than £300,000, whilst a terrace on Fairland Road, Gurney Road or Idmiston Road will cost around £350,000.

Amenities

E15 is home to four railway stations catering to the DLR, National Rail, London Underground, and international lines. All of the stations are in Travelcard zone 3. Maryland station is located in the north eastern sector of E15 and has trains going in both directions every 10 minutes. This station will be a stop for the Crossrail when it is constructed in 2017. Pudding Mill Lane station caters to the DLR (Docklands Light Rail) and has trains in both directions at least every 15 minutes, if not more often. West Ham station is the primary underground station in the area. It is located in the northern sector of E15 and caters to the Hammersmith & City, Jubilee, and District Lines. West Ham Station also caters to the c2c line and has 8 tph to Fenchurch Street, 4 tph to Shoeburyness, 2 tph to Grays via Rainham, and 2 tph to Southend Central via Ockendon. Stratford Station is located in the centre of E15 and caters to the DLR, Central, and Jubilee as well as National Rail and c2c. There is a plethora of trains leaving from all of these lines as often as 10 tph. Stratford Station will also be a stop for the Crossrail when it is completed.

Soon, E15 will see the opening of Stratford international station, an international Train station catering to the Eurostar to Paris. At the moment the Eurostar from St. Pancras passes through this station without stopping, however in February 2009, the station will open in order to cater to Paris Gare Du Nord.

E15 is home to some of the 2012 Olympic developments and is experiencing some redevelopment.

Pubs and Bars in the area include: The Manbe Arms on Water Lane, The Dew Drop on Brydges Road, The Builders Arms on High Street, The Essex Arms on Leytonstone Road, The King Edward VII on Broadway, The Princess of Wales on West Ham Lane, and Ye Olde Black Bull on Broadway.